Giving schema back its good name

For modern applications, the word “schema” has become synonymous with the tables, columns, constraints, indexes, and foreign keys in a relational database management system. A typical relational schema affects physical concerns (like record layout on disk) and logical concerns (like the cascading deletion of records in related tables).

Schemas have gotten a bad name because current RDBMS tools give them these rotten attributes:

Improvements to the Materialized View API

The Materialized View API (related posts) provides resources for pre-aggregation and indexing of data for use in complex queries. It does this by managing denormalized tables based on data living elsewhere in the database (and possibly elsewhere). As such, materialized views (MVs) must be populated and updated using large amounts of data. As users change data on the site, MVs must be intelligently updated to avoid complete (read: very slow) rebuilds. Part of performing these intelligent updates is calculating how user changes to data affect MVs in use. Until now, these updates had limitations in scalability and capability.