Weekly watercooler #96

In this issue: Headless Drupal roundup, why you should design in the browser, the Quartz redesign, simulating user actions with CasperJS; plus the end of the printed newspaper, a Magna Carta for the web, rethinking the responsive grid, Mobile Web Apps FTW, making SVG responsive, and a compendium of beautiful open source sites.

Cecy Correa
August 29, 2014

Frontpage news: A look at the Quartz redesign

Just as I was looking at Quartz last week as an example of a site that mimics native app design, they’ve gone and redesigned the whole thing. In the previous design, there’s one clever thing I never noticed – a lack of a homepage. Instead, if you went to qz.com directly, you would land on the site’s featured story with a sidebar of links to more articles.

before

Aaron Stanush
August 26, 2014

Simulate user actions with CasperJS

In this installment of our CasperJS series, we will begin looking at ways to interact with a website as a regular visitor would. Clicking links, using keyboard navigation, and filling forms are all standard activities as we browse websites. Read on to see how easy it is for Casper to do the same.

Why design in the browser?

Web design began as an extension to print design — the history of tables and image maps show how we’ve evolved. In the infancy of the web the tools created for print design were utilized heavily and that legacy still survives today. But the web is not print. It has different constraints and is mutable in ways print has never been. As the web has become more mature and grown in its ubiquitousness, the tools that are used to develop it have changed as well.

Weekly watercooler #95

4K news this week

Congrats to David Diers and Elliott Foster for their hard work in helping to bring the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon website to life. They can now say their work is Emmy award-winning!

Want to know what the Web Chefs do for fun? Check out this interview with Vivek Goel on his racing career outside of work!

Cecy Correa
August 22, 2014

Bringing smiles to pull requests with GitHub selfies

I’ve been part of a completely distributed team on a fantastic, very large scale project. We have team members anywhere between Germany and California, stakeholders in New York, and a lot of moving pieces. We’re coming up on the midway point and we’re making great progress. However, when communicating almost exclusively virtually it’s easy to lose perspective and forget that humans are making this all happen. Then, we heard about Matt Andrew’s experience with GitHub selfies to improve team morale. And you know what? It’s a great idea.

Jon Peck
August 22, 2014

DrupalCamp Twin Cities: Frontend wrap-up

This year’s Twin Cities DrupalCamp had no shortage of new faces, quality sessions, trainings, and after parties. Most of my time was spent in frontend sessions and talking with folks. Being that I live in Minneapolis, this camp is especially rewarding from a hometown Drupal represent kind of perspective. Below are some of my favorite sessions and camp highlights.

Weekly watercooler #94

In this issue: DrupalCon Amsterdam frontend roundup, Sass as a responsive band-aid, SXSW 2015 session proposals; plus everyone hates their CMS, fonts for code, PerfBar, and Giphy on IFTTT.

Cecy Correa
August 15, 2014

Road to SXSW 2015!

The Web Chefs are at it again! Here are our session proposals for SXSW 2015: Content strategy for fast, friendly design. Open-source management: how to do it well and good. And last but not least, Coders who teach.

Cecy Correa
August 15, 2014